ICT 4 Peace Foundation

2022 Council of Delegates of the ICRC

Event description

Event date: 22–23 June 2022

The 2022 Council of Delegates of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement (ICRC) will be held under the theme ‘A movement for purpose.’ Among the topics that will be discussed during the Council is the collection and safeguarding of humanitarian data. The Council aims to call on states and other actors to respect and protect impartial humanitarian organisations both online and offline and safeguard them from harmful cyber and information operations of any kind.

For more information, please visit the official page.

The 50th Regular Session of the Human Rights Council

Event description

Event date: 13 June – 8 July 2022

Representatives of the member states in the Human Rights Council will come to Geneva to partake in 27 interactive dialogues (ID) Special Procedures mandate holders and mechanisms and 9 interactive dialogues with the High Commissioner. The Special Rapporteur on freedom of expression and opinion Ms Irene Khan will present her report (A/HRC/50/29) on media freedom of expression in the digital age in an ID. A public high-level panel discussion will focus on the laws and practices addressing the negative impact of disinformation on the enjoyment and realization of human rights.

For more information, and to register, please visit the official page.

WIPO Symposium on Trade Secrets and Innovation

Event description

Event date: 23–24 May 2022

The WIPO Symposium on Trade Secrets and Innovation provides an exchange platform for ideas and perspectives with regard to the intersection of trade secrets and innovation in both the technological and service sectors. The 2022 symposium will focus on the ‘roles of trade secret systems in supporting innovation and knowledge sharing in a rapidly changing innovation ecosystem’. The discussions will cover the interaction between trade secrets and innovation policies, how to balance legitimate interests in trade secret systems, the international/cross-border environment, the scope of data protection, trade secret management and knowledge sharing, the development and dissemination of medical technologies, and defence against allegations of trade secret misappropriation.

For more information, and to register, please visit the official page.

[Launch] Global Report on Assistive Technology (GReAT)

Event description

Event date: 16 May 2022, 15:00–16:00 CEST

The Global Report on Assistive Technology (GReAT) was jointly produced by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF). Acknowledging the central role that assistive technology and enabling environment play for people in need in their comprehension of human rights, the report highlights evidence-based best practices along with ten key actionable recommendations on improving access to assistive technology. The launch event will be emceed by Ms Nujeen Mustafa (author, refugee, and disability rights advocate) and include a list of distinguished guest speakers.

For more information, and to register, please visit the official page.

Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development

Address: Place des Nations, 1211 Geneva 20, Switzerland

Website: https://www.broadbandcommission.org/

Stakeholder group: International and regional organisations

The Broadband Commission was originally established in 2010 by the ITU and UNESCO as the Broadband Commission for Digital Development in response to UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon’s call to boost the UN’s efforts to reach the millennium development goals.

In 2015, following the adoption of the sustainable development goals (SDGs), the Broadband Commission was relaunched as the Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development, with the aim of showcasing and promoting information and communication technologies (ICTs) and broadband-based technologies for sustainable development by putting digital co-operation into action.

Led by President Paul Kagame of Rwanda and Carlos Slim Helù of Mexico, it is co-chaired by ITU’s Secretary-General Houlin Zhao and UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay. It comprises over 50 commissioners who represent a cross-cutting group of top CEOs and industry leaders, senior policymakers and government representatives, and experts from international agencies, academia, and organisations concerned with development.

Digital activities

The Broadband Commission focuses on closing the digital divide and promoting broadband development in developing countries and underserved communities, ensuring that all countries reap the benefits of digital technologies. The Broadband Commission’s efforts are detailed in the annual State of Broadband report, and take the form of thematic working groups and regular meetings and advocacy activities at the margins of flagship events such as WEF (Davos), GSMA MWC, IGF, HLPF, WSIS, and UNCTAD e-Commerce week.

In 2018, the Broadband Commission set seven objectives in its 2025 Targets initiative to help ‘connect the other half’ of the world’s population by expanding broadband infrastructure and access to the Internet.

Digital policy issues

Telecommunications infrastructure 

The Broadband Commission promotes the adoption of practices and policies that enable the deployment of broadband networks at the national level, especially among developing countries. It engages in advocacy activities aimed to demonstrate that broadband networks are basic infrastructure in modern societies and could accelerate the achievement of the SDGs. The Broadband Commission publishes an annual State of the Broadband Report, providing a global overview of broadband network access and affordability, with country-by-country data measuring broadband access.

The Broadband Commission also launched a number of the working groups focused on ICT connectivity, including the World Bank led: Working group on Broadband for all: a ’Digital Infrastructure Moonshot’ for Africa and the Working Group on 21st Century Financing Models for Sustainable Broadband Development in 2019. These initiatives aim to provide governments and policymakers with a set of policy recommendations to foster innovative financing and investment strategies to achieve the Broadband Commission’s targets for broadband connectivity and adoption​.

The ongoing global pandemic has put at the forefront the vital role that broadband networks and services play in making economies and societies work, In response to the effects of the pandemic, the Broadband Commission adopted the Agenda for Action: For Faster and Better Recovery to accelerate the world’s response. This initiative includes immediate and long-term efforts that governments, global industry, civil society, and international organisations can undertake to support the development and strengthening of digital networks that remain so integral to our economy and society. The three pillars of resilient connectivity, affordable access, and safe use of online services provide a framework for all commissioners to mitigate the adverse effects of COVID-19 and lay the foundation for a better and faster recovery.

Access 

When advocating for the rollout of broadband infrastructure and bridging the digital divide, the Broadband Commission underlines the increasing importance of Internet access and adoption as an enabler of sustainable growth and development. It is paying particular attention to aspects related to the deployment of infrastructure in developing countries, education and capacity development, and safety online (particularly for children and youth), as well as the digital gender divide and the empowerment of women in the digital space.

Sustainable development

The Broadband Commission advocates for actions to be taken by all relevant stakeholders with the aim to close the digital divide, which is seen as an important step towards the achievement of the SDGs. Its annual State of the Broadband Report looks at the progress made in implementing broadband networks in various countries around the world, which it regards as an essential element in addressing the digital divide.

The Broadband Commission also addresses the impact of digital technologies on specific issues covered by the SDGs. One example is the Working Group on Digital Health, whose final report outlined recommendations for improving human health and well-being by implementing universal digital health coverage. In 2019, the Working Group on Data, Digital, and AI in Health was launched with the aim of raising awareness of the transformative power of data and artificial intelligence (AI) in health systems worldwide.

The Broadband Commission has also been active in environmental and climate change issues; in particular, its activities (ranging from publications and events to advocacy actions) cover the link between climate change and ICTs.

Interdisciplinary approaches

The work of the Broadband Commission contributes to the UN Secretary-General’s Roadmap for Digital Cooperation, which lays out how all stakeholders can play a role in advancing a safer and more equitable digital world. Through its range of working group initiatives and the advocacy of its commissioners, the Broadband Commission is an example of SDG 17: ‘Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalise the global partnership for sustainable development.’

 

International Electrotechnical Commission

Acronym: IEC

Address: Rue de Varembé 3, 1211 Geneva 20, Switzerland

Website: https://iec.ch

Stakeholder group: International and regional organisations

Founded in 1906, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) is the world’s leading organisation for the development of international standards for all electrical and electronic technologies. The IEC’s standardisation work is advanced by nearly 20 000 experts from government, industry, commerce, research, academia, and other stakeholder groups.

The IEC is one of three global sister organisations (in addition to the ISO and ITU) that develop international standards.

Digital Activities

The IEC works to ensure that its activities have a global reach in order to meet all the challenges of digital transformation worldwide. The organisation covers an array of digital policy issues illustrated below.

Digital policy issues

Digital standards 

 The IEC carries out standardisation and conformity assessment activities covering a vast array of technologies. These range from smart cities, grids, automation, and energy to electromagnetic compatibility between devices, digital system interfaces and protocols, and fibre optics and cables. Other areas covered by the IEC include multimedia home systems and applications for end-user networks, multimedia e-publishing and e-book technologies, information and communication technologies (ICTs), wearable electronic devices and technologies, cards and personal identification, programming languages, cloud computing and distributed platforms, the Internet of Things, and information technology (IT) for learning, education, and training.

Over the past 30 years, the IEC and ISO Joint Technical Committee (JTC 1) have been developing IT standards for global markets, meeting business and user requirements. This work addresses various aspects including the design and development of IT systems and tools; interoperability, performance, and quality of IT products and systems; harmonised IT vocabulary; and security of IT systems and information. Some of the areas that JTC 1 covers include:

  • Cards and security devices for personal identification
  • Computer graphics, image processing, and environmental data representation
  • Coding of audio, picture, multimedia, and hypermedia information
  • Automatic identification and data capture techniques
  • Data management and interchange
  • IT for learning, education, and training
  • Biometrics
  • Trustworthiness
  • Digital twins
  • Quantum computing
  • 3D printing
  • Augmented reality and virtual reality-based ICT
  • Autonomous and data-rich vehicles
Internet of things 
The Internet of Things (IoT) is one of the main technology sectors covered by the IEC (International Electrotechnical Commission) in its standardisation activities. Several technical committees (some of which are joint groups with the ISO – International Organization for Standardization) focus on various aspects of the Internet of Things. Examples include: standardisation in the area of IoT and related technologies, including sensor networks and wearable technologies; smart cities; smart grid (which involve the use of technology for optimal electricity delivery); and smart energy. In addition to developing standards, the IEC also publishes white papers, roadmaps with recommendations, and other resources on IoT-related issues. IECEE and IECQ, two of the four IEC Systems for Conformity Assessment, verify that digital devices/systems perform as intended.
Artificial intelligence 
Another important technology sector tackled by the IEC is artificial intelligence (AI). Standardisation activities in the area of AI are mostly covered by a joint IEC and ISO technical committee (ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 42). The committee has recently published a new technical report that aims, among others, to assist the standards community in identifying specific AI standardisation gaps. SC 42 has set up several groups that cover specific aspects of AI, such as computational approaches and characteristics of AI systems, trustworthiness, use cases and applications of AI systems, to name a few.

The IEC also publishes white papers, recommendations and other resources on AI-related topics.

Cloud computing 
 Cloud computing is an enabling technology, based on the principles of shared devices, network access and shared data storage.

ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 38 has produced international standards with cloud computing terms and definitions and reference architecture. Other work includes a standard which establishes a set of common cloud service building blocks, including terms and offerings, that can be used to create service level agreements (SLAs), which also covers the requirements for the security and privacy aspects of cloud service level agreements.

SC 38 has produced a standard for data taxonomy, which identifies the categories of data that flow across the cloud service customer devices and cloud services and how the data should be handled.

Network security 
In the area of cybersecurity, IEC works with ISO in their joint technical committee to develop the ISO/IEC 27000 family of standards. In addition, the IEC operates globally standardized systems for testing and certification (conformity assessment) to ensure that standards are properly applied in real-world technical systems and that results from anywhere in the world can be compared. To this end, IECQ (IEC Quality Assessment System For Electronic Component) provides an approved process scheme for ISO/IEC 27001. The IECEE (IEC System of Conformity Assessment Schemes for Electrotechnical Equipment and Components) Industrial Cybersecurity Programme focuses on cybersecurity in the industrial automation sector.
Critical infrastructure 
The IEC develops horizontal standards, such as the IEC 62443, for operational technology in industrial and critical infrastructure that includes power utilities, water management systems, healthcare and transport systems. These standards are technology independent and can be applied across many technical areas. On the other hand, several technical committees and subcommittees develop international standards to protect specific domains and critical infrastructure assets (vertical standards).

 

Sustainable development 
 The IEC international standards and conformity assessment systems contribute to the realisation of all 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). They provide the foundation allowing all countries and industries to adopt or build sustainable technologies, apply best practice, and form the basis for innovation as well as quality and risk management.

 

Capacity development 
The IEC Academy Platform aims to support IEC community members through formal learning and collaboration opportunities. The IEC offers a series of online courses and webinars that provide an in-depth understanding of IEC’s main activities.

Future of meetings

Any reference to online or remote meetings?

  • IEC technical committees have held online/remote meetings for many years, especially for focussed discussions on individual topics. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic the breadth of technical online meetings has been further expanded to ensure optimal continuation of standardization and conformity assessment activities. Most face-to-face management board and governance meetings have been converted to online meetings during COVID-19. In support of the successful organization of online meetings, the IEC has published a virtual meeting guide.

Any reference to holding meetings outside HQ?

  • Many IEC meetings are held outside of IEC CO headquarters or online or in a hybrid format. The tools for that purpose include webinars, podcasts, online presentations and various teleconferencing facilities. In the future, augmented reality technology or digital twin approaches may also be considered to provide the benefits of face-to-face meetings. While face-to-face meetings have been the rule to date, some IEC Board meetings have also been held virtually to some extent already in the past, with documents being shared in advance on proprietary online platforms and collaboration taking place live online.

Any reference to deliberation or decision making online?

  • In the IEC, nearly all decision-making processes have been taking place virtually since many years, with voting/decisions being dispatched electronically, including collaboration and commenting via a dedicated electronic platform.

Inter-Parliamentary Union

Acronym: IPU

Address: Chem. du Pommier 5, 1218 Le Grand-Saconnex, Switzerland

Website: https://ipu.org

Stakeholder group: International and regional organisations

The Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) is the global organisation of national parliaments. It was founded more than 130 years ago as the first multilateral political organisation in the world, encouraging co-operation and dialogue between all nations. Today, the IPU comprises 179 national member parliaments and 13 regional parliamentary bodies. It promotes democracy and helps parliaments become stronger, younger, gender-balanced, and more diverse. It also defends the human rights of parliamentarians through a dedicated committee made up of MPs from around the world. Twice a year, the IPU convenes over 1,500 parliamentary delegates and partners in a world assembly, bringing a parliamentary dimension to global governance, including the work of the UN and the implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Digital Activities 

The IPU’s digital activities mainly focus on the promotion of the use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in parliaments. To this end, it has established a Centre for Innovation in Parliament, which undertakes research on the impact of digital technologies on parliaments, publishes the landmark World e-Parliament Report, hosts the biannual World e-Parliament Conference and co-ordinates a network of parliamentary hubs on innovation in parliaments.

Digital policy issues

Capacity development 

In line with its objective to build strong and democratic parliaments, the IPU assists parliaments in building their capacity to use ICTs effectively, both in parliamentary proceedings and in communication with citizens. The IPU has also been mandated by its member parliaments to carry on capacity development programmes for parliamentary bodies tasked to oversee observance of the right to privacy and individual freedoms in the digital environment.

The IPU also encourages parliaments to make use of ICTs as essential tools in their legislative activities. To this aim, the IPU launched the Centre for Innovation in Parliament in 2018 to provide a platform for parliaments to develop and share good practices in digital transformation strategies, as well as practical methods for capacity building. The IPU holds the World e-Parliament Conference, a biannual forum that addresses from both the policy and technical perspectives how ICTs can help improve representation, law-making, and oversight. It also publishes the annual World E-Parliament Report.

As of August 2020, eight regional and thematic parliamentary hubs are operating under the Centre for Innovation in Parliament, covering IT governance, open data and transparency, hispanophone countries, Eastern Africa, Southern Africa, the Caribbean, and the Pacific. Each hub is co-ordinated by a national parliament and brings together parliaments to work on subjects of common interest, such as remote working methods during COVID-19.

Sustainable development 

The IPU works to raise awareness about the sustainable development goals (SDGs) among parliaments, and provides them with a platform to assist them in taking action and sharing experiences and good practices in achieving the SDGs.

Privacy and data protection 

One of the IPU’s objectives is to promote and protect human rights. To this aim,its Committee on Democracy and Human Rights is involved in activities aimed to contribute to ensuring privacy in the digital era and the use of social media as effective tools to promote democracy. A 2015 resolution on ‘Democracy in the digital era and the threat to privacy and individual freedoms’ calls on parliaments to create adequate mechanisms for the protection of privacy in the online space, and to ensure that legislation in the field of surveillance, privacy, and data protection is based on democratic principles.

Freedom of expression 

The IPU’s Committee on Democracy and Human Rights works, among others, on promoting the protection of freedom of expression in the digital era and the use of social media as an effective tool to promote democracy. In 2015, the IPU adopted a Resolution on ‘Democracy in the digital era and the threat to privacy and individual freedoms’ encourages parliaments to remove all legal limitations on freedom of expression and the flow of information, and urges them to enable the protection of information in cyberspace, so as to safeguard the privacy and individual freedom of citizens.

Digital tools